Educational Programs in the Jennifer Chalsty Planetarium

The Jennifer Chalsty Planetarium is the biggest planetarium in the Western Hemisphere.

The 89-foot dome, coupled with the all-dome video and astronomical object database, provides an immersive environment in which to explore the Earth and Space Systems Performance Expectations of the NJSLS:S. View astronomical objects and celestial phenomena from the surface of Earth, and then travel into space to truly understand these difficult concepts by flying up to, around, and through the objects.

Time can also be sped up in the planetarium, allowing you to make an entire year of space systems observations during one program—seasons, Moon phases, seasonal constellations, and more. Tour the universe without ever leaving your seat!

Bring your school group to experience a show in the planetarium. For more information, please call 201.253.1310 or email sales@lsc.org.

The Sky Tonight (K – 12)

Using the unique immersive environment of the planetarium, students will explore earth and space science concepts using the current night sky above New Jersey. Topics covered are correlated with objects visible in the night sky on your visit date. Topics can include: Day and Night, Phases of the Moon, Reasons for the Seasons, Seasonal Constellations, Planets, Eclipses, Meteor Showers and more. NJSLS:S: All topics discussed during the program will be correlated to the corresponding Earth and Space Systems Performance Expectations for the grade level of the students attending the program.

Wonderful Sky (Grade 1)

Explore observations of the Sun, Moon, and stars to discover patterns that can be predicted. These patterns include sunrise and sunset locations, moon phases, and how constellation visibility varies with Earth’s position from season to season. NJSLS:S: Space Systems: Patterns and Cycles 1-ESS-1-1

Are We There Yet? (Grade 5)

Explore observations of the Sun, planets, and stars to discover that objects in the universe are located at large distances from Earth and exhibit predictable cyclic patterns. Large objects can appear very small when they are located far from Earth. The length of day and night repeats on a yearly cycle. Constellation visibility varies with Earth’s position from season to season. NJSLS:S: Space Systems: Stars and the Solar System: 5-ESS1-1, 5-ESS1-2

Phases and Eclipses and Seasons, Oh My! (Middle School)

Develop a conceptual model of the cyclic patterns of lunar phases, eclipses of the Sun and Moon, and the reason for the seasons. These astronomical phenomena will be explored from both the surface of Earth and outer space as we virtually leave the planet to give students a unique perspective that is only possible in the immersive environment of the planetarium. NJSLS:S: Space Systems: MS-ESS1-1

Life Cycles of the Stars (High School)

Explore observations of the Sun, planets, and stars to discover that objects in the Develop a conceptual model of the formation of the universe and the life cycle of a star. Construction of this model will use evidence from stellar light spectra, the motion of distant galaxies, the composition of matter in the universe, nuclear fusion, and the production of elements in stars. The immersive environment of the planetarium allows students to travel back in time to the formation of the universe to explore these space science phenomena. NJSLS:S: Space Systems: HS-ESS1-1, HS-ESS1-2, HS-ESS1-3